Frequently asked questions

Frequently asked questions

What is AAC?

What does AAC Voice do?

What does AAC Voice want?

How did AAC Voice start?

How much does it cost to join?

Does AAC Voice do advocacy?

What kind of people use AAC?

How do I choose the right AAC options for myself or someone I know?

 

What is AAC?

AAC stands for Augmentative and Alternative Communication. AAC is anything that supplements or replaces speech. This includes signs, gestures, spelling boards, symbol boards, books, tablets and speech generating devices.

 

What does AAC Voice do?

AAC Voice works to raise awareness of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) and to support the social inclusion of people who use AAC to communicate.

AAC Voice has monthly meetings. We organise social events for AAC users and their allies. We also run educational events to share information about AAC.

AAC Voice advocates for AAC users and helps members enhance their communication, advocacy and mentoring skills.

 

What does AAC Voice want?

We want people who use AAC to be understood and respected in the community, regardless of what communication system they use.

We want people with a communication disability to have fair access to services, including AAC systems and support.

We want people who use AAC to have a voice in the community and to be able to fulfill their potential and follow their dreams like everybody else.Not being able to talk doesn't mean I have nothing to say

 

How did AAC Voice start?

In 2010, a group of people who use AAC and their supporters formed AAC Voice to develop a consumer-led group for people who use AAC to support each other and share information.

How much does it cost to join?

Membership is $30 for the first year when you join AAC Voice.

Then it costs $20 each year to renew your membership.

Join now!

Does AAC Voice do advocacy?

AAC Voice advocates for the needs of AAC users at a community level.

AAC Voice is a small organisation and does not have the capacity to provide individual advocacy services, but we can direct you to other organisations who might help.

What kind of people use AAC?

All sorts of people use AAC.

Some people are born with a disability that prevents speech. Cerebral palsy, autism, and many other congenital conditions can prevent or inhibit the ability to speak.

Other people lose their ability to speak later in life because of injury or disease, such as accidental brain injury, stroke, or motor neurone disease.

There are many conditions that can mean that AAC is a person's best form of communication.

Some people who use AAC have an intellectual disability, but most do not. They have the same thoughts and feelings as everybody else, but need a different way of speaking.

How do I choose the right AAC options for myself or someone I know?

A speech pathologist or other professional with expertise in AAC can work with you to find AAC options that best suit your needs. In Australia, you need to work with a speech pathologist if you intend to apply for funding under the National Disability Insurance Scheme to purchase an AAC system.

Some speech pathologists have more experience with AAC than others; you should ask them about how they can support you in this area. You can find a speech pathologist with an interest in AAC at www.speechpathologyaustralia.org.au.